Bulletin
The Monument Lab Bulletin is a collaborative platform for critically reading and reimagining monuments. We invite contributors who are deeply committed to changing the way we study, build, and interpret monuments. We welcome contributions from artists, students, scholars, activists, municipal agencies, and cultural institutions. Learn how to contribute
announcement
Re:Generation – Announcing Nationwide Cohort of Public Art and History Projects Launching in Spring 2022

Re:Generation is a nationwide participatory public art and history project organized by Monument Lab launching in Spring 2022. The goal: to elevate the next generation of monuments that reckons with and reimagines public memory. The project subgrants a total of $1 Million across ten local field offices led by collaborative teams of artists, educators, storytellers, and organizers; each working on a commemorative campaign rooted in the living history of a neighborhood, city, or region. Monument Lab’s Re:Generation opens across the country from May Day–Labor Day 2022. Re:Generation is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s Monuments Project.

story
Iván Argote, Monumental Ecology

Iván Argote's monumental interventions reckon with colonial histories while urging viewers to confront the violence—both immediate and slow— of ecological change. 

story
Monumental Conditions: Pasts and Futures of Washington, D.C.’s Tidal Basin

"The only thing inevitable about the Tidal Basin is entropy." 

Although preservation practices aim to contain, restore, and reconstruct, our global climate challenges call on us to embrace transition and impermanence in envisioning emergent futures. 

announcement
Monument Lab announces its inaugural Changemaker Award recipient – Dr. Salamishah Tillet.

Monument Lab announces its inaugural Changemaker Award recipient – Dr. Salamishah Tillet.

research
Christopher Columbus: WE NEVER WANTED HIM HERE

WE NEVER WANTED HIM HERE is a zine created as part of Audit the Streets, a large-scale public data portal with placenames and monuments connected to the historical figures for whom they are named by researchers at MIT's Data + Feminism Lab. The zine explores the long histories of resistance to the legacies of Christopher Columbus, while auditing the nation's unequal heritage landscape toward transformation and memory justice. 

research
A Hawaiian Perspective on Monuments

Through animated storytelling, Qwaves and Kanaka Pakipika share the Indigenous memories and meanings of sites, providing the foundation for developing collaborative, community-rooted commemorative practices that are rooted in the sacred meanings of Hawaii’s storied places. Through such storytelling strategies and public engagements, this collective of independent media makers promote gender, cultural, racial, economic, and political justice in Hawai'i.