Tethers to Invisible Monuments

Born and raised in East Los Angeles, Monument Lab Fellow Joel Garcia has seen the city change for better or for worse by means of political movements, violence, housing development, and erasure of narratives, among countless other things. His experiences have shaped his relation to land, place, and memory and the lack of access to it. In this essay, he writes on how public areas can be transformed from spaces of trauma to ones of healing and the importance of advocating for oneself.

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Collapsing the Distance

The Crossbones Graveyard is a paupers’ gravesite located in South London. Prior to the 1990s, this burial site was unmarked and those buried here largely forgotten. Since its rediscovery, the local community has rallied together to honor those buried there. How can this site give insight to the individual narrative in monuments and memorials and how we choose to remember those that have passed?

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An Unlikely Collaboration

This essay is taken from the publication for Molly Crabapple & Marwan Hisham: Syria in Ink opening March 22 at Haverford College's Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery. Molly Crabapple & Marwan Hisham: Syria in Ink brings together literature in the form of memoir and visual art in the form of ink drawings. It invites viewers to experience the words and images of a young Syrian coming of age during the turbulent last decade.

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The Silent Sam Syllabus: A Module for Teaching Confederate Monumentality

The “Silent Sam Syllabus,” designed by Graduate Student Researcher Evander Price (American History at Harvard), is intended to teach Confederate monumentality by examining the events at UNC Chapel Hill. This syllabus will continue to evolve as events and history unfold. We encourage readers to submit their own suggestions, ideas, etc. with the intent of improving the syllabus.

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Announcing the 2019 Monument Lab National Fellows

Monument Lab is proud to announce our inaugural cohort of fellows. Chosen through a national open call, these civic practitioners and youth fellows confront the inequity and injustice in our nation’s monuments and provide bold, creative approaches to public art, history, and memory. Some of the fellows have been working toward these ends for decades. Others began only recently, but have already made impressive, vital contributions. Together, they represent a new guard who are radically redefining what it means to engage public spaces, sites of history, and monuments today.

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AnnouncementsMonument Lab
Eternal Glory to the People’s Heroes! On Beijing’s Monument to the People’s Heroes

Next year, 2019, will mark an ignominious anniversary in China. Thirty years will have passed since the violent crackdown of student protesters on Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Co-Curator Ken Lum examines the most important aesthetic edifice relating to the events of Tiananmen Square: the Monument to the People’s Heroes, often overlooked by non-Chinese viewers despite its centrality to the events of 1989.

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The Question of Monuments

In our national conversation on the power that Confederate monuments hold in public memory, there is one dynamic discussion that has fallen off the radar. How are we facing the void of black monuments? Monument Lab Graduate Researcher Hilary Malson explores Black geographies and the question of Monuments.

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Survivors’ Monument

San Francisco’s Sister City relationship with Osaka was terminated over a statue dedicated to “comfort women” forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese army during World War II. Patricia Eunji Kim writes on San Francisco’s "Column of Strength," dedicated by the Comfort Women Justice Coalition, as a site of transnational #MeToo.

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NewsPatricia Eunji Kim