Introducing Our Graduate Student Researchers

MalsonHeadshot_Small.jpg

Hilary Malson
Twitter @hildistrict

Hilary Malson is a student of geography and urban planning in the Urban Planning PhD program at UCLA. Her research examines black and brown migrations to exurban areas. She is thinking through the role of collective memory for multi-located communities, analyzing how those experiences impact spaces, practices, and forms of community development, and framing those narratives within planning history.

Hilary has worked at the intersection of community development and public history for the past decade. She has developed public scholarship and digital content for an array of organizations, including the Smithsonian Institution’s Anacostia Community Museum, the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. She holds a MSc in Urbanization and Development from the London School of Economics and a BA in the Growth and Structure of Cities from Haverford College. Hilary proudly hails from Washington, D.C.


Price_Headshot_Small.jpg

Evander Price
evanderprice.com
Twitter @elpriceisright

Evander Price is a PhD candidate in American Studies at Harvard University. His dissertation research proposes a new category of monumentality, the “future monument.” Unlike most monuments, which ask audiences to remember the past, future monuments are built explicitly to manifest an imagination of the future. The dissertation explores three different monuments spanning the twentieth century, specifically the 1939 World’s Fair, the NASA Voyager Golden Record, and the 10,000 Year Clock of the Long Now Foundation. These temporally strange monuments offer perspective on changing American cultural values and anxieties across the century, as well as both eco- and chronocritical insight. They show how imagined futures, even if never realized, still pressure the present. He hopes to help shape the larger emerging field of time studies and show the many ways that assumptions and metaphors of time tremendously impact how people treat each other and the world around them. The future isn’t what it used to be.

Monument Lab